IDEA’s new design

We hope you like the new design of IDEA’s websites! All of the content from the old sites is still here, just in a different format. You’ll see on the IDEA Home site that the events calendar and IDEA Blog are highlighted so you can more readily keep track of the public presentations, project launches, and research developments that have become such a big part of IDEA in the last few years.

The new sites are designed to accommodate more content, and we’ve been busy working with new researchers and commissioning essays. Each essay is evaluated by readers and copy-edited to insure standards of scholarly excellence. If you would like to propose an essay or an entire project to IDEA, please tap the “Contact Us” button in the blue field at the bottom of any screen – we welcome your contributions!

On all of IDEA’s sites – IDEA HomeArt/e, Letter/e, Music/a – the left side of the splashpage focuses on the continually developing environment – the events calendar, project descriptions, research platforms, and users’ guides, – while the right column offers introductory essays about the Isabella d’Este Archive and Isabella’s interactions with various subjects. Each site contains different essays, and we’ve begun peppering IDEA’s sites with secret treasures as well, so be sure to explore!

IDEA’s new design makes navigation much easier than before. The navigation bar at the top of every screen features nested menus with links to all IDEA’s websites and informational pages about each project. The blue field at the bottom of every screen offers a site map, image links to IDEA websites, and a “Contact Us” button. If you would like to receive email notifications about new events, tap the “Follow” tab on the right side of your screen.

Watch for new developments at IDEA! The IDEA Bibliography project is preparing to launch, and we’re looking forward to new essays in the early months of 2018.

IDEA Ceramics Workshop & Presentation at the University of Wyoming

Guest scholar Lisa Boutin Vitela writes about her visit to the University of Wyoming on October 26, 2017:

“I helped lead discussion about Isabella d’Este’s patronage for an art history seminar about medieval and Renaissance women. I then gave a quick introduction about maiolica at a ceramics workshop where we painted maiolica tiles and plates. Finally, I gave my talk. Because Wyoming has a large studio arts program, many of the students and faculty were primarily interested in the making of the maiolica and Ester Mantovani’s project (which you can see in The Illustrated Credenza video). Students were also interested in exploring the IDEA website and databases. Everyone especially enjoyed the Virtual Studiolo preview video when I showed it in the seminar.”

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship goes to Italian Songs from the Time of Christopher Columbus

Principal Investigator Anne MacNeil writes:

“Since the mid-18th century, scholars have been accustomed to thinking of musical works of art as embodied in their notation. The restrictions of print culture on the publication of critical editions has perpetuated and entrenched this line of thinking. But with the vastly increased resources afforded by digital humanities, Italian songs from the time of Christopher Columbus aims to create a critical edition of the late-15th- and early-16th-century repertory of Italian and Latin songs known as frottole that displaces this notion and relocates the object of study in music as a sounding work of art.”